5 Things you must know about “The Shinning”

1. For the scenes when we can hear Jack typing but we cannot see what he is typing, Stanley Kubrick recorded the sound of a typist actually typing the words “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy”. Some people argue that each key on a typewriter sounds slightly different, and Kubrick wanted to ensure authenticity, so he insisted that the actual words be typed.

2. During the making of the movie, Stanley Kubrick would occasionally call Stephen King at 3:00 a.m. and ask him questions like “Do you believe in God?” Steven Spielberg had heard this story and asked Kubrick if it was true. Kubrick denied that it happened.

3. The idea for Danny Lloyd to move his finger when he was talking as Tony was his own; he did it spontaneously during his very first audition.

4. The color red is visible, either overtly or subtly, in nearly every shot of the film.

5. Stephen King, the Author of the book on which the movie was based, was quite disappointed in the final film. While admitting that Stanley Kubrick’s visuals were stunning, he said that was surface and not substance. He often described the film as “A fancy car without an engine.”

5 Things you must know about “The Shinning”

1. For the scenes when we can hear Jack typing but we cannot see what he is typing, Stanley Kubrick recorded the sound of a typist actually typing the words “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy”. Some people argue that each key on a typewriter sounds slightly different, and Kubrick wanted to ensure authenticity, so he insisted that the actual words be typed.

2. During the making of the movie, Stanley Kubrick would occasionally call Stephen King at 3:00 a.m. and ask him questions like “Do you believe in God?” Steven Spielberg had heard this story and asked Kubrick if it was true. Kubrick denied that it happened.

3. The idea for Danny Lloyd to move his finger when he was talking as Tony was his own; he did it spontaneously during his very first audition.

4. The color red is visible, either overtly or subtly, in nearly every shot of the film.

5. Stephen King, the Author of the book on which the movie was based, was quite disappointed in the final film. While admitting that Stanley Kubrick’s visuals were stunning, he said that was surface and not substance. He often described the film as “A fancy car without an engine.”